Author Archives: Bob Lawrence

About Bob Lawrence

artist, photographer, reader, animation fan, jazz listener, poet who dislikes rhyming

Southeast Airlines

southeast

Southeast Airlines, an E. Ward King enterprise, was a short-lived commuter line that flew out of Tri-Cities to Memphis and Nashville and probably other airports in the state.  It lasted from 1957 to 1959, when, after failure to obtain air mail contracts and a horrific crash on Holston Mountain, the airline went out of business.

This is a soda/beer bottle recapper with the handy-dandy bottle neck loop so the cap won’t get lost.

A Couple of Items

A couple of items bobbed up at an area flea market mall.

jacks

About 5.5″ long.  Blank on the other side.  Sturdy, by golly.

kptshoe

This store was located in a row of shops that has long been demolished.  It was on the land now occupied by a car washing operation.  Kent Potts owned the store.  The Jarman shoe brand is still being made, but the company in Nashville is now known as Genesco.

Gone Mill

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riceback

There has been discussion about whether this was Rice or Hord Mill, but, make no mistake, it’s Gone Mill now.  My buddy and I carefully walked around this mill in 2014 and were surprised at how well it had survived.

No more. I’ve heard what happened to it, but I can’t verify the story.

Cherokee Post Card Company in Jefferson City appears to have been doing chromes of East Tennessee sometime in the 1960s.

Volunteer State Printing Company, assumed from the monogram, yields no citations.

Interesting Post Card

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This card is postmarked Dec. 7, 1943.  Two years to the day after Pearl Harbor.  By this time in the war, we were raining death on the cities of Cittavecchia and Pescara, Italy, among other unlucky locations.

Three months later, Mussolini would fall from power as the Italians felt their part of the war was lost.

The card is shown as being published by Asheville Post Card Company, but it was printed by Miller Art Company in Brooklyn…which went out of business in 1941 (1922 – 1941).

Consider: this card may have been printed around the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  <sneak in weird music> Strange, but true, maybe.

C. T. C. was Kingsport’s city bus company.

Heritage Federal

hfpen

Courtesy of Carl Swann.

Heritage Federal Savings and Loan Association, 110 East Center Street, started out in 1930 and meandered on until 1981, when somebody kicked of a flurry of acquisitions (read all about it here).  It officially lost the name in 1995 when it was acquired by First American National Bank, now part of Regions Bank.

The logo, which is partially cut off in this shot, is a symbolic Minuteman haloed by, guess what, 13 stars.  Heritage, get it?

One snowy evening, around 1957 or 1958, as I was sloshing my way down to the library, which was then on the corner of East Center and Shelby Streets, I saw Martin Karant doing a live remote in the big window at Heritage Federal.  He was soliciting money for some organization.  I walked in and volunteered to help (I was quite young at the time).  I stood outside, in the snow, for a half hour or so and offered a canister for people to put coins in.  In those years, there were quite a few people out walking around downtown in the evenings, shopping and so forth.

Dimes from the Press

Courtesy of Carl Swann

dime

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Difficult to date this. Since there’s no ZIP code and “Tenn.” is used instead of “TN”, I’d guess pre-1963.

The “Kingsport Press, Inc.” is stamped on.

The Abbott Coin Counting Company made coin sorting machines from about 1917 or so.  It’s now in Connecticut.

If you find a $3 dime coin wrapper, grab it.  They’re rare.