Category Archives: Kingsport TN ephemera

An Evening with Canon

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This was probably 1982.  Jim wasn’t at the Ft. Henry Drive all that long and, by 1993, the next time a Thursday fell on September 30, he had moved to the Eastman Road location.

I miss camera shops.  Back then, I couldn’t afford much in the way of cameras and lenses.  I made do, thanks to some horse trading with Jim, but I really yearned after the new cameras and the fast (for then) lenses.

Jim and Janet and Paul and Jeff.  Great people to work with (I did some camera repair) and to talk with.

 

The Stuff That’s Coming

World War II had ended a little over a year before this ad was published in the July 1946 Intermountain Telephone Company Telephone Directory for Kingsport, Gate City and Sullivan Gardens.  Dobyns-Taylor was, in essence, priming the pump.  Little did they know the flood of products that would soon wash over them.

Dam!

 

It’s rare to find a postcard with a blatant grammatical error in the first two words of the description on the back.  “Heavy buttresses impounds…”  My Adam’s apple bobs up and down as I hesitantly raise a trembling hand to voice that, generally, the subject and the verb should agree.

Anyway, this picture was taken in the early to mid-60s.  The dam was actually finished in 1917 (100 years ago! Go, dam!).  You’re looking at a pile of rocks holding back over 100 million gallons of water.  After the Boone Dam imbroglio, a crew came in and inspected this dam.  It’s holding up quite well.

Credit line is Photo by John Sullins.  It was printed by International Graphics, Inc. in Hollywood FL.

Warriors’ Path State Park

 

This is how the Park looked in the early 1960s.  It was published by Roanoke’s Haynes Distributing Company. The company did a photo run through our area in the early 1960s and C. H. Ruth seems to have been their go-to guy for airplane shots.   These cards are called “chromes”, since Kodachrome was the film of choice then.

I’d heard a story that this park grabbed the State Park designation from what is now Steele Creek Park (it was going to be Watauga State Park) in Bristol and, thus, left Bristolians sad and bereft.  The dates don’t add up, though.  There were plans to make Steele Creek a State Park, but organizers had given up on that in 1945.  The land for WPSP was acquired from TVA in 1952, a year before the dam was completed.

Steele Creek Park, a city park, came about in 1964.  Many Bristolians I’ve talked to have fond memories of enjoying this park when they were kids.  It’s still just fine.  Good hiking trails!  And a LOT of ducks.

 

Sixty-six Years Ago

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Dobyns-Bennett High School. This card, luckily, was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago and I can read the inventory number to tell when it was printed: 1951. The photo may have been taken in 1950. Again, the coloring is false (the photo was taken in black and white), though the application at the printing company hewed to notes taken by the photographer.  Any automobiles or other distractions may have been edited out.

It was published by Blackburn News Agency in Kingsport.

The linen finish on the front, applied during the printing process, is rather heavy handed.  I know the company experimented with different linen patterns at times, so this may have been a new plate.

Our Venerable Civic Auditorium

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This is a Haynes Publishing postcard (printed by Dexter) from the mid-60s.  When the photo was taken, this barrel-roofed building was over 40 years old; it was finished in 1940 as the Kingsport Civic Auditorium and Armory.  It was built under the Public Works Administration.  If the resolution of the image were better, I might be able to read more of the sign, but I think it’s for a wrestling match. I checked the Times-News archives, but couldn’t match anything up.

I wonder if all the armor, since it’s no longer an “armory, is now down at the library…

Eastman, with Bridge

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Another Haynes Distributing postcard, printed by Dexter, West Nyack NY.  On December 4, 1967, that bridge, already 50 years old, collapsed when the driver of a 13.5 ton truck drove onto the 5-ton limit bridge.  Someone had helpfully removed the load limit sign on the Long Island side of the bridge.  The driver, though quite chilled after the 30-odd foot drop into the South Fork of the Holston River, wasn’t hurt.Afterwards, Eastman firmly opposed rebuilding the bridge, citing things like height, depth, width, water, air, arm-waving and other important considerations.

Since this card was mailed at the Downtowner Motor Inn, which wasn’t completed until 1962, the slightly non-existant postmark is probably 1965.

And we all hope Mrs. Frisco got out real soon.