Category Archives: Kingsport TN ephemera

Central School Building

In 1918, as WWI slowly ground to a halt in Europe and the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic began raging out of the foul trenches of that war, Kingsport was building its first combined school building. The building, much remodeled, still stands at the corner of Watauga Street and East Sevier Avenue.
This post card, probably printed in the early 1920s, is another of the series commissioned by T. J. Stephenson.

Summer, 1946

This Kingsport Intermountain Telephone Directory was issued in July, 1946. These are two of the three pages of restaurant listings compiled probably in late spring or early summer of ’46. The Center Street Grill building became Center Street Restaurant, then the AAA Office and has been vacant for years.

“Chat & Chew Grill”?!?

Just out of curiosity, I wondered who had the lowest number listing in the directory and it turned out to be Hutchwallen Florists at number 1. Hutchwallen (it’s spelled that way in the directory) was located directly in front of the train station, where that patch of flowers is now.

I couldn’t find a listing for number 2, but Huff Funeral Home and Ambulance Service – at Charlemont and Watuaga – had 3, General Shale Sales Office had 4 and Clinchfield Railroad Company Ticket Agent had 5.

The directory is a fascinating glimpse of the business community in Kingsport as the nation came out of WWII.

Launch of a Vessel at Belfast

belfast

belfastback

Interesting postcard.  Printed in Germany, published in London.  It’s pre-WWI.  Addressed to a party in Gate City from “Guess Who” in Kingsport, but never mailed.

The “London E.C.” stands for London’s East Central Postal District.

B & D, Pictorial Post Card Pioneers, (Blum & Degan) operated in London from 1885 to 1908, when they went bankrupt.

Gone Mill

ricefront

riceback

There has been discussion about whether this was Rice or Hord Mill, but, make no mistake, it’s Gone Mill now.  My buddy and I carefully walked around this mill in 2014 and were surprised at how well it had survived.

No more. I’ve heard what happened to it, but I can’t verify the story.

Cherokee Post Card Company in Jefferson City appears to have been doing chromes of East Tennessee sometime in the 1960s.

Volunteer State Printing Company, assumed from the monogram, yields no citations.

Dimes from the Press

Courtesy of Carl Swann

dime

dime2

Difficult to date this. Since there’s no ZIP code and “Tenn.” is used instead of “TN”, I’d guess pre-1963.

The “Kingsport Press, Inc.” is stamped on.

The Abbott Coin Counting Company made coin sorting machines from about 1917 or so.  It’s now in Connecticut.

If you find a $3 dime coin wrapper, grab it.  They’re rare.