Tag Archives: Kingsport TN

Roberts & Johnson Lmb’r Co

tapemeasure

This grubby little number has been around for a while.  Roberts & Johnson Lumber Company, located next to Oakwood on West Sullivan Street, burned in the late 70s.  For some reason, nothing was ever done with the plot of land at 451 West Sullivan.  Except for now, since the land will be subsumed by the development taking place in that area.  Alas, if this were yours and you just had to measure something, you’d be out of luck…it’s rusted closed.

Kingsport Post Cards, Part 4

ASHEVILLE POST CARD COMPANY 1940S SERIES

The earliest post mark (PM) I have on these is 1939.  The cards all have printing company inventory numbers that would yield the printing date, if there were an available list, which there isn’t. The founder of the company died in 1977.  The company itself was bought out in 1982.

A few of these cards are quite common.

K.18  ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND PORTION OF PLANT, TENNESSEE EASTMAN CORPORATION.  KINGSPORT, TENN.  (1423)
(on back) Tennessee Eastman Corporation, Kingsport, Tenn.  The principal product of this plant is Eastman Cellulose Acetate, from which are made Photographic Film, Eastman Acetate Rayon, Tenite, and transparent sheeting for safety glass.

K.19  A GENERAL VIEW BY NIGHT OF TENNESSEE EASTMAN CORPORATION PLANT, KINGSPORT, TENN.   (BELOW) HOLSTON RIVER IN FOREGROUND AND RANGE OF CLINCH MOUNTAINS IN BACKGROUND  (1424)
(on back) same as K-18

K.20 KINGSPORT INN, KINGSPORT, TENN.   (1420)
(on back)  Kingsport Inn is conveniently located on the circle near the center of the city.  From its veranda is visible Kingsport’s industrial plants and the distant ranges of the Blue Ridge and Cumberland Mountains.  It is of Southern architecture, has well-landscaped grounds and immediately attracts those who seek rest. It is a nationally-known stopping place for travelers and offers clean, comfortable rooms and excellent food at moderate rates.

K.21 “ROTHERWOOD”, KINGSPORT, TENN. (1425)
(on back) ROTHERWOOD  This stately old estate, located on the west bank of the Holston River, has had a romantic history. The original home, built in 1818 by Dr. Ross, a Presbyterian minister, was burned in the last year of the Civil War, but was reconstructed later.  It was named for the castle of Cedric the Saxon in Scott’s “Ivanhoe”, the book of which Dr. Ross was particularly fond.

K.22 U.S. POST OFFICE, KINGSPORT, TENN. (1426)  Note: there are two versions of this card.  One, with rather low value colors, has no description on the reverse.  The other, with brighter colors, has the following on the back:  Kingsport, Tenn., a City of planned modern industrial development began its growth in 1916 with a population of only 600.  Today, greater Kingsport has a population of around 35,000.  Kingsport is one of the most important industrial and distribution centers in Tennessee.  It is also called a city of churches and schools.  There are many places of interest to the visitor in and around Kingsport and motor roads from five States converge here.  The cacilities of the Tri-City’s airport are available to those travelling by air.

K.23 (above image) SUNSET SCENE SHOWING CHIMNEY TOP MOUNTAIN (below image) ON U.S. ROUTE NO. 11W BETWEEN BRISTOL AND KINGSPORT, TENN. (1421)

K.24 BRIDGE OVER HOLSTON RIVER ON U.S. HIGHWAY 23, BETWEEN KINGSPORT AND JOHNSON CITY, TENN.  (1422)

K.25.- WAUTAUGA (sic) STREET, KINGSPORT, TENN.  (45383)

K26.- BROAD STREET LOOKING NORTH, KINGSPORT, TENN. (45384)

K-27  NIGHT-TIME SCENE OF WAUTAUGA (sic) STREET, KINGSPORT, TENN. (E-7373)

K-28  PANORAMIC VIEW OF KINGSPORT, TENN. (E-7374)

K-29  BROAD STREET FROM RAILROAD STATION, KINGSPORT, TENN. (E-7375)

K-30 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, KINGSPORT, TENN. (E-8602)  On back is a text area that has been overprinted.  The text read: The First Baptist Church, Kingsport, Tenn., was organized in 1910. The value of church property is $25,000.00.  Radio ministry Sundays 11:00 – 12:00 A.M. Station WKPT. Dr. T. B. Cobb, Pastor.

K-31 Title on card above the image has been effectively overprinted.  Below image:  DOBYNS-BENNETT HIGH SCHOOL, KINGSPORT, TENN. (E-7806)

K-32   “ROTHERWOOD” KINGSPORT, TENN.  (E-10600)
On back: ROTHERWOOD – A Historic Residence built in 1816 at Confluence of the North and South Forks of the Holston River, at Kingsport, Tennessee.

K-33  AIRPLANE VIEW OF TENNESSEE EASTMAN CORP. PLANT, KINGSPORT, TENN.  On back: TENNESSEE EASTMAN CORPORATION, Kingsport, Tenn. One of the State’s largest industrial units, Eastman manufactures Cellulose Acetate, from which are made Estron yarns, Tenite and Photographic Film. Many other chemicals made here.        Note: early photo shows part of Edgewood Village.

K-34  LEGION POOL WITH CIVIC AUDITORIUM AND J. FRED JOHNSON PARK IN THE BACKGROUND.   Below image: KINGSPORT, TENN. COPYRIGHTED-KINGSPORT ROTARY CLUB    (E-10602)

K-35  A BIRDSEYE VIEW OF THE CIRCLE, KINGSPORT, TENN.  Below image: PHOTO BY: ELLIS BINKLEY, KINGSPORT, TIMES-NEWS    (E10605)

K-36    BIRD’S-EYE VIEW OF THE MEAD CORPORATION, KINGSPORT, TENN.  (E-11082)

K-37  HOLSTON VALLEY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, KINGSPORT, TENN.  (E-11083)

Kingsport Post Cards Part 3

Miscellaneous issues:

These two: probably before 1915  not white border.  B&w w/ blue tint  Divided back.  Same back style on each.  Not publisher/printer information on cards

  • On front bottom in a script-style font face: Ruins of Tavern on Old Stage Road, Kingsport, Tenn.
  • On front top left in all caps italic: Kingsport Pulp Corp., Kingsport, Tenn. (shows plant under construction…plant was producing paper by 1916)

 

B&w issue, undivided back, not white border  issued between 1907 – 1914 (station was built in 1905)   C C. & O PASSENGER STATION, KINGSPORT, TENN.  Photo by Bachelder’s Studio     Shows train station w/ Cement Hill in background

 

The Albertype Co., Brooklyn, N.Y.  Post Cards of Quality

Kingsport Inn, Kingsport, Tenn.  Black & white  Shows the Inn’s game room.  Issued between 1907 and 1914. (near photo quality)

 

Real Photo Post Card (RPPC).  RPPCs are generally one-offs.  Shows the Big Store, corner of Shelby and Main (neither paved).  Written on negative “Kingsport Stores”.
Can clearly see the Post Office in the Big Store.  The Big Store was built in this location in 1910.

 

RICHARD ALVEY ISSUES:   These aerial photo post cards, halftones, b&W, with the card description sniped on the front except for the AIR VIEW OF KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, which is standard format.  All are white border.  Dick Alvey (1898 – 1983) had access to an airplane and took these photos in 1937. He later used them in his Wings Over Kingsport (1938) and Wings Over Kingsport 2 (1963).

1) AIR VIEW OF KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. C-414  PM 1940. On the back: PHOTO BY ALVEY, PUB. BY C.G. SMITH, KINGSPORT, TENN.  Printed by Allied Printing, Fort Wayne

The following five cards are also b&w halftones, white border.  On back: PUB. BY PALACE FRUIT & NEWS CO., KINGSPORT, TENN. PHOTO BY RICHARD ALVEY, KINGSPORT, TENN.  All are Silvercraft cards printed by Dexter Press, Pearl River, N.Y.  Fake deckle edge.

13549 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING THE MILLER-SMITH HOSIERY MILL, THE HOLLISTON MILLS OF TENNESSEE AND THE KINGSPORT PRESS KINGSPORT, TENN   PM 1942   On back: AERIAL VIEW SHOWING PORTION OF INDUSTRIAL SECTION. LEFT TO RIGHT ARE THE MILLER-SMITH HOSIERY MILL, THE HOLLISTTON (sic) MILLS OF TENNESSEE AND THE KINGSPORT PRESS.  THE KINGSPORT PRESS HAS A CAPACITY OF 100,000 BOOKS PER DAY, THE LARGEST PRIVATELY OWNED PRODUCER OF BOOKS IN THE WORLD.  KINGSPORT, TENN.

13550 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING KINGSPORT’S FAMOUS CIRCLE KINGSPORT, TENN.
On back: CIVIC CIRCLE  AERIAL VIEW SHOWING KINGSPORT’S FAMOUS “CIRCLE”, ALSO THE POST OFFICE..A, KINGSPORT UTILITIES..B, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH..C, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH..D, BROAD STREET METHODIST CHURCH..E, FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH..F, AND THE KINGSPORT INN…G.  (note: the reference letters have been inked on the front)

13551 AERIAL VIEW OF HOLSTON VALLEY BETWEEN KINGSPORT, TENN. AND JOHNSON CITY, TENN.  On back: AERIAL VIEW OF HOLSTON VALLEY, SHOWING CAMP HAMMOND BRIDGE OVER THE HOLSTON RIVER, BETWEEN KINGSPORT, TENN. AND JOHNSON CITY, TENN.

13552 AERIAL VIEW OF BORDEN MILLS INCORPORATED KINGSPORT, TENN
On back: AERIAL VIEW OF BORDEN MILLS INCORPORATED, MANUFACURERS OF COTTON CLOTH.  WEEKLY PRODUCTION AVERAGES 600,000 YARDS.  KINGSPORT, TENN.  (note: in pencil, “10-4-40”)

13553 AERIAL VIEW OF THE BUSINESS DISTRICT KINGSPORT, TENN.  PM 1945

Shelby Street Apartments

shelby

Early morning, sometime around 1925.  It’s another T.J. Stephenson card…I’ve posted information about him here.  (Nothing special on the back, except the inventory number of 121035…the lowest number of these cards I have is 121023 and the highest is 121042.  It’s a Tichnor Quality Views card)

I think these were all residential then.  When I delivered papers down this street in 1957, there were several businesses along the way.  Whenever I catch the smell of kneaded erasers, my memory escorts me back to an art supply store about halfway down the street.  I’ve mentioned before that my dream was to have all the illustration board I wanted.  Got there.  Did that.

Oh, look, Ma!  No antennas on Bays Mountain.  Obviously.

Sobel’s

I thank Carl Swann for this item.  Its age is indeterminate.  The “Sobel’s The Men’s Store” appears to have been hot stamped onto the shoehorn. “Shoehorn” is an old word, dating back to the late Middle Ages, as a “schoying horne” (it’s all in Wikipedia)…a “horn” in the sense of a tool to help put on a shoe.  There were various sizes (long ones for boots); this one is 3.5″ long.

Nunn Bush shoes are still distributed by Weyco in Wisconsin…Weyco is essentially a Florsheim operation since 1964.  Weyco claims a founding date of 1892.  Nunn Bush was established by Henry LIghtfoot Nunn in 1912.  I don’t know what happened to Bush.  I can’t find a reference.  Really, his middle name was “Lightfoot”?  Too punny.

When I was in the Air Force, we had the opportunity to purchase Florsheim dress shoes.  For whatever reason, most all of us had gone back to our Government-issue shoes in six months or so.  The Florsheims just didn’t hold up well (this was back in the mid-60s).

Trading Stamps – The Fever

If you wish to brush up on your history of S&H Green Stamps, head over hereOtherwise, read on about K-Savers trading stamps.


This is the book you’d stick your K-Savers stamps in, all notated (as far as I know) as worth 25 units of something.  The book is 3-3/4″ by 5-7/8″.  The stamps, shown below, each measure 1/2″ x 1-7/8″.
In the 1950s, Oakwood Markets, dating from the late 40s, was seeing a bubbling up of Green Stamp Fever, fed by market competitor Giant Supermarkets.  Figuring to find a parade and get in front of it (a favorite suggestion of Don Raines, my former boss), Wallace Boyd, one of the founders of Oakwood Markets, started Tennessee Stamp Company and began to spread K-Saver stamps across their multiple locations (11 or so in the 70s).  K-Savers had a catalog and a brick-and-mortar store at 813 Eastman Road – the site, next to Sloopy’s, is now home to a gas station.

   

Inside front cover, showing part of a stamp page, and inside of the back cover.

1157 Eastman Road was the location of the Oakwood Market in Greenacres Shopping Center. And note there are none of the legal conditions (you don’t own the stamps!) that S&H put on the back cover of their redememption booklets.

 

WKPT Studio

wkpt

I’m taking a chance here, but I think this was taken before the fire that severely damaged the WKPT studios.  I don’t recognize the studio configuration or that strange wall treatment.

I didn’t have any luck tracking down when Pilgrims Songs sheet music was published, but the microphone is a Western Electric 639 or so, made in the late 1930s (after 1941, it would have been branded as an Altec).  This mike, or one like it, was still around when I was at WKPT.  People had their preferences as to the setting.  I liked cardioid and got fussed at one time for switching it.  Today, these mikes are selling for around $600 to $800 on ebay.

There is nothing of interest on the back of this card…no publisher, no photographer attribution.  Annoying.