Tag Archives: Kingsport TN

Trading Stamps – The Fever

If you wish to brush up on your history of S&H Green Stamps, head over hereOtherwise, read on about K-Savers trading stamps.


This is the book you’d stick your K-Savers stamps in, all notated (as far as I know) as worth 25 units of something.  The book is 3-3/4″ by 5-7/8″.  The stamps, shown below, each measure 1/2″ x 1-7/8″.
In the 1950s, Oakwood Markets, dating from the late 40s, was seeing a bubbling up of Green Stamp Fever, fed by market competitor Giant Supermarkets.  Figuring to find a parade and get in front of it (a favorite suggestion of Don Raines, my former boss), Wallace Boyd, one of the founders of Oakwood Markets, started Tennessee Stamp Company and began to spread K-Saver stamps across their multiple locations (11 or so in the 70s).  K-Savers had a catalog and a brick-and-mortar store at 813 Eastman Road – the site, next to Sloopy’s, is now home to a gas station.

   

Inside front cover, showing part of a stamp page, and inside of the back cover.

1157 Eastman Road was the location of the Oakwood Market in Greenacres Shopping Center. And note there are none of the legal conditions (you don’t own the stamps!) that S&H put on the back cover of their redememption booklets.

 

WKPT Studio

wkpt

I’m taking a chance here, but I think this was taken before the fire that severely damaged the WKPT studios.  I don’t recognize the studio configuration or that strange wall treatment.

I didn’t have any luck tracking down when Pilgrims Songs sheet music was published, but the microphone is a Western Electric 639 or so, made in the late 1930s (after 1941, it would have been branded as an Altec).  This mike, or one like it, was still around when I was at WKPT.  People had their preferences as to the setting.  I liked cardioid and got fussed at one time for switching it.  Today, these mikes are selling for around $600 to $800 on ebay.

There is nothing of interest on the back of this card…no publisher, no photographer attribution.  Annoying.

Ramp!

ramp

This is the back of the old Coca-Cola bottling plant on West Sullivan.  The trucks backed up this ramp to be loaded for deliveries.  Backing up the ramp must have been fun, especially before dawn.  Or raining.  Or in snow.

The windows in front of the building allowed you to watch the process as the bottles whizzed by.  Hot stuff in the ’50s.

Tennessee Valley Dragway

This was part of the Tennessee Valley Dragway (1965 – 1969), looking east to Cleek Road.  Had the strip been completed, it would have spanned the 3/4-mile or so between Cleek Road and an area in front of the present Traders Village. Note: the access to this area is gated.  It’s on private land.

Interesting history…read about it here.

First Baptist Church

Glenn Souders was working as a photographer for the Kingsport Times-News in the early 60s.  I suppose the “Souders Photo Service” was a side business for him.

I mention this for two reasons: a) this is the only card I’ve ever seen that lists him as the publisher (it was printed by Dexter Press in New York) and b) I was hired by Glenn at WKPT Radio in 1967.  He, much later, became a priest.  He showed up at the station sometime in the 90s and the boss brought him by my office.  The expression on my face when I saw him in a collar caused them both to laugh.

An Evening with Canon

canonfront

canonback

This was probably 1982.  Jim wasn’t at the Ft. Henry Drive all that long and, by 1993, the next time a Thursday fell on September 30, he had moved to the Eastman Road location.

I miss camera shops.  Back then, I couldn’t afford much in the way of cameras and lenses.  I made do, thanks to some horse trading with Jim, but I really yearned after the new cameras and the fast (for then) lenses.

Jim and Janet and Paul and Jeff.  Great people to work with (I did some camera repair) and to talk with.

 

The Stuff That’s Coming

World War II had ended a little over a year before this ad was published in the July 1946 Intermountain Telephone Company Telephone Directory for Kingsport, Gate City and Sullivan Gardens.  Dobyns-Taylor was, in essence, priming the pump.  Little did they know the flood of products that would soon wash over them.