Tag Archives: Kingsport TN

Puppy Tags

In the early 1950s, cities around the country provided two metal identification tags to all school children.  Authorities had considered tattooing, but the threat of severe burns cancelled that.  Fingerprinting was out, too, as an invasion of personal privacy.  So, it was metal tags, which the kids were supposed to wear around their necks on a metal bead chain.  These are two that were issued to children in Jackson School.  I’ve covered the information because the people are still alive.

tags

And, while researching these tags, I found out that the “tooth notch” found on authentic military dog tags of the time (and later: when I got my dog tags in 1963, the notch was there…I have no idea of where those tags are now) was actually there to properly orient the metal tag in the Model 70 Addressograph Hand Identification Machine.

I never got tags when I was in school, but, then, we moved around a lot.

Moose Lodge #972

moose

At this time, the Kingsport Moose Lodge was located on Reservoir Road, in a location now crossed by I-26.  It’s food and natatorium were much admired.  In 1985, law officers raided the place and confiscated several slot machines.

On the back of this money clip, the logo “HIT”-USA is debossed.  That company, as far as I can tell, is still doing business on line as Hit Promotional Products.

A Couple of Items

A couple of items bobbed up at an area flea market mall.

jacks

About 5.5″ long.  Blank on the other side.  Sturdy, by golly.

kptshoe

This store was located in a row of shops that has long been demolished.  It was on the land now occupied by a car washing operation.  Kent Potts owned the store.  The Jarman shoe brand is still being made, but the company in Nashville is now known as Genesco.

Interesting Post Card

wataugafront

wataugaback

This card is postmarked Dec. 7, 1943.  Two years to the day after Pearl Harbor.  By this time in the war, we were raining death on the cities of Cittavecchia and Pescara, Italy, among other unlucky locations.

Three months later, Mussolini would fall from power as the Italians felt their part of the war was lost.

The card is shown as being published by Asheville Post Card Company, but it was printed by Miller Art Company in Brooklyn…which went out of business in 1941 (1922 – 1941).

Consider: this card may have been printed around the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  <sneak in weird music> Strange, but true, maybe.

C. T. C. was Kingsport’s city bus company.

Heritage Federal

hfpen

Courtesy of Carl Swann.

Heritage Federal Savings and Loan Association, 110 East Center Street, started out in 1930 and meandered on until 1981, when somebody kicked of a flurry of acquisitions (read all about it here).  It officially lost the name in 1995 when it was acquired by First American National Bank, now part of Regions Bank.

The logo, which is partially cut off in this shot, is a symbolic Minuteman haloed by, guess what, 13 stars.  Heritage, get it?

One snowy evening, around 1957 or 1958, as I was sloshing my way down to the library, which was then on the corner of East Center and Shelby Streets, I saw Martin Karant doing a live remote in the big window at Heritage Federal.  He was soliciting money for some organization.  I walked in and volunteered to help (I was quite young at the time).  I stood outside, in the snow, for a half hour or so and offered a canister for people to put coins in.  In those years, there were quite a few people out walking around downtown in the evenings, shopping and so forth.