Southeast Airlines

southeast

Southeast Airlines, an E. Ward King enterprise, was a short-lived commuter line that flew out of Tri-Cities in the late 1950s

For a brief wrap up of the King legacy, check this site

Here’s link to story of the horrific crash on Holston Mountain

This is a soda/beer bottle recapper with the handy-dandy bottle neck loop so the cap won’t get lost.  It was made by Replicap Products, Inc. of Greenville OH.  As far as I can tell, they were quite active up until the mid-80s or so.  I don’t find any current listing for them.

A Couple of Items

A couple of items bobbed up at an area flea market mall.

jacks

About 5.5″ long.  Blank on the other side.  Sturdy, by golly.

kptshoe

This store was located in a row of shops that has long been demolished.  It was on the land now occupied by a car washing operation.  Kent Potts owned the store.  The Jarman shoe brand is still being made, but the company in Nashville is now known as Genesco.

Gone Mill

ricefront

riceback

There has been discussion about whether this was Rice or Hord Mill, but, make no mistake, it’s Gone Mill now.  My buddy and I carefully walked around this mill in 2014 and were surprised at how well it had survived.

No more. I’ve heard what happened to it, but I can’t verify the story.

Cherokee Post Card Company in Jefferson City appears to have been doing chromes of East Tennessee sometime in the 1960s.

Volunteer State Printing Company, assumed from the monogram, yields no citations.

Interesting Post Card

wataugafront

wataugaback

This card is postmarked Dec. 7, 1943.  Two years to the day after Pearl Harbor.  By this time in the war, we were raining death on the cities of Cittavecchia and Pescara, Italy, among other unlucky locations.

Three months later, Mussolini would fall from power as the Italians felt their part of the war was lost.

The card is shown as being published by Asheville Post Card Company, but it was printed by Miller Art Company in Brooklyn…which went out of business in 1941 (1922 – 1941).

Consider: this card may have been printed around the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  <sneak in weird music> Strange, but true, maybe.

C. T. C. was Kingsport’s city bus company.